Tasco Rifle Scopes – Which one is the best?

LAST UPDATED: August 31st 2018
GUIDE: Chris Browning

If you’re in the market for a rifle scope, you might be confused by the sheer number of makes and models available today. There are way too many to go over in a single article, so today we’re going to narrow it down to Tasco brand scopes.

Our pick for the best Tasco rifle scope is the Varmint 2.5-10x 42mm. This scope comes with a lifetime warranty and offers MOA adjustments for windage and elevation, but doesn’t have a parallax adjustment as at only 10x magnification, it’s not needed. The 42mm objective lens guarantees more light on the target.

Terminology

Before we go over Tasco rifle scopes, let’s look at some unfamiliar terminology you might come across when looking for a scope. You might see some or all of these terms in a scope listing.

  • Reticle: This refers to what’s commonly called the ‘crosshairs’. It’s the equal-armed cross you see in the scope when you look through it. There are three main types of reticle.
    • Duplex–this is the standard and most common reticle consisting of thick black bars that narrow toward the center, automatically drawing the eye to the center.
    • Mildot–a mil dot reticle is similar to the duplex, except it has a series of dots in the center instead of a bar. Mildot reticles can be used to adjust for range without adjusting the scope.
    • BDC–this is a Bullet Drop Compensator, and allows the user to adjust for bullet drop for longer shots.
  • MOA: this is part of a scope’s adjustment and stands for Minute of Action. This adjustment is ideal for scopes within 100 yards.
  • MRAD: this is a scope adjustment and stands for milradian. It’s good for rifles shooting over 100 yards.
  • Parallax: this refers to the inability of the reticle to focus on the target, and many scopes over 12x magnification come with an adjustment for parallax.
  • Eye Relief: this refers to the distance you can be away from the scope and still have a field of view.
  • Bullet Drop: refers to the effect of gravity on the bullet, causing it to drop over long distances.

What to Consider Before Buying

There are several factors you should consider before you decide on what scope you’re going to buy. This will depend on what you’re intentions are for the scope. If you’re hunting, you’ll want to have certain features, but if you’re just target shooting, other features may be important.

Reticle

The reticle an important factor in your choice of scope. It’s what is commonly called the ‘crosshairs’, though with different types now available, most listings will call it a reticle. A better understanding of reticles will help you decide.

Duplex

This is the basic reticle or ‘crosshairs’ found in most inexpensive scopes. It’s an equal-armed cross of thick black bars that thin as they near the center point. This narrowing helps guide the eye toward the center of the field of view.

Mildot

This type of reticle is similar to a duplex, but instead of narrowing bars in the center, it consists of a series of dots. This enables the user to make minute adjustments for bullet drop or range without adjusting the scope.

BDC

A BDC (Bullet Drop Compensator) reticle combines all the features of the other two, but adds range markers within the reticle to adjust for bullet drop. This is especially important if you plan to shoot from vast ranges over 500 or 600 yards.

Magnification

When looking for a scope you’ll notice a series of numbers in the listings. The numbers before the X relate to the magnification power of the scope. A 4x scope can magnify the image 4 times larger. Double numbers, like the 6-24x Tasco in the YouTube video above, can magnify from 6 to 24 times the original size.

If you’re out hunting in the woods, a high magnification scope won’t do you much good. But, if you’re a target shooter looking for long-range shots, you’ll want a scope with higher magnification.

Objective Lens

This is the second number you’ll see on a scope listing, after the number and X of the magnification. The objective lens is what allows light to pass through the scope to the eyepiece.

A 50mm objective lens allows more light than a 40mm lens, causing the target to appear brighter. You might want a larger objective lens if you like to hunt, where you’ll likely be in the field at dawn and dusk.

A larger objective lens might mean a heavier scope, so keep this in mind when shopping for a scope. It might also make it difficult to walk through heavily wooded areas, possibly getting hung up on tree branches or undergrowth.

Adjustments

Many scopes can be adjusted for windage and elevation as well as for parallax. The two types of adjustments are MOA and MRAD. MRAD adjustment works better when paired with a BDC reticle and for distances over 600 yards. MOA adjustment is ideal for distances around 100 yards.

Specific Tasco Scopes

Now that you know a little more about how scopes work, we can look more closely at specific models of Tasco rifle scopes.

1. World Class 3-9x 40mm

Tasco World Class 3-9x40This scope has a magnification from 3-9x and an objective lens of 40mm, which is fairly average for scopes. Its reticle is suitable for 30/30 firearms, meaning the crosshairs represent an area 30 inches across at 4x magnification from 100 yards.

The World Class is 100% waterproof and has an eye relief of 3.5 inches. It uses MOA adjustments for windage and elevation, but because it only magnifies to 9x, the scope doesn’t have an adjustment knob for parallax.

2. Rimfire Series 3-9x 32mm

Tasco Rimfire Series 3-9x 32mmThis scope is intended for use on rimfire rifles. It has a variable magnification from 3 to 9x, but the smaller objective lens means less light will enter the field of view.

The Rimfire Series is 100% waterproof and uses MOA adjustments for windage and elevation. It also has a parallax adjustment knob. You’ll get 3 inches of eye relief with this scope. Mounting rings are also included with this scope.

This scope can only be used on .22 rimfire rifles.

3. Varmint 2.5-10x 42mm

Tasco Varmint 2.5-10x 42mmThis variable magnification scope goes from 2.5 to 10x and it has a 42mm objective lens. But, the Varmint comes with a mildot reticle. You’ll get a 3 inch eye relief with this scope.

The Varmint uses MOA adjustment knobs for windage and elevation, but has no adjustment for parallax. It’s 100% waterproof and has multi-coated optics. It comes with a limited lifetime warranty.

4. Pronghorn 3-9x 40mm

Pronghorn 3-9x 40mmThis scope has a 30/30 reticle and comes with MOA adjustment for windage and elevation, but doesn’t have parallax adjustments. You’ll get eye relief of 3 inches.

The Pronghorn is 100% waterproof and fogproof and is tough enough to carry in the woods. The optics are fully coated for a clear field of view.

The scope comes with a one-year warranty.

5. Target 6-24x 42mm

Target 6-24x 42mmThis scope has a magnification range from 6-24x, making it good for longer shots in the field. But, it doesn’t offer adjustable parallax, something to keep in mind for long, accurate shots.

The Target comes with a mildot reticle and uses MOA adjustments for windage and elevation. You’ll get a 3-inch eye relief when using this scope.

It comes with a limited lifetime warranty. All the optics are coated for clarity.

Concluding Thoughts

Buying a scope is a big investment and you want to make sure you get the best for your money. By now, you should have an excellent idea of what might work best for you. Pay attention to magnification, objective lens size, and other accessories that you might need.

Our Pick
 Tasco Varmint 2.5-10x 42mm
Best Tasco Rifle ScopeVarmint 2.5-10x 42mm

This variable magnification scope goes from 2.5 to 10x and it has a 42mm objective lens. But, the Varmint comes with a mildot reticle. You’ll get a 3 inch eye relief with this scope.

Check Price

The Tasco Varmint 2.5-10x 42mm is an excellent all-around scope for hunting purposes. You’ll get up to 10x magnification with a 42mm objective lens, which allows a good amount of light into your field of view. The Varmint also comes with a limited lifetime warranty, so you can rest assured Tasco will stand behind their product.

For more scopes reviews visit our Gun Scopes Page.

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